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cranberry

What are your memories of Sunday around the table? My Sundays as a child were one of the busiest days in our week, so lunch wasn’t necessarily fancy, many times there was a church potluck involved or lunch on the go or leftovers. But we were always together. Around the table. With people outside our family sitting with us.

I can’t think of a better way to “live church” than to do it around at table full of food, and as part of this month of writing, I’m hoping to intersperse the storytelling with some practical ideas about eating meals with others, with our family, and how simple yet satisfying the process can be.

There are so many ways to “do” food on Sunday, and I’ve tried a few myself in the past few years depending on our family routine and schedule. Last winter I kept it simple with a chicken soup (you can read more about that here). I could prepare everything the day before in the pot, and all that needed to be done on Sunday morning was pour water over everything, put it on the stove and wait. Our lunch was warm, hearty and simple. And it allowed us to slow down and rest. It was beautiful.

But chicken soup during the summer months and even now in the autumn didn’t feel right, it was too warm. We’ve started having a roast chicken lunch instead. It involves a little bit more time on Sunday morning (probably around 20 minutes more), but because the oven is what does most of the work, it’s ok. This is a meal that can easily feed a mid-sized family, and we love sitting down together on a Sunday to eat something a little bit more special, all of us passing food back and forth to each other, Big Boy and Little Bear happily munching along. It’s also a meal that keeps on giving, there are leftovers for Monday’s lunch and sometimes even Tuesday.

chicken 2

Roast Chicken with Cranberry & Thyme Butter

The secret to a good roast chicken is the bird itself. We’ve recently switched to buying organic, free-range meat as much as possible, and we have been amazed at the difference in the quality of the meat and the flavour. We ate this with stuffed and sauteed mushrooms (Big Boy cooked the sauteed mushrooms), and with roasted sweet potatoes using this recipe for sweet potato fries but I cut it into wedges instead, and steamed broccoli. 

70g butter
30g cranberries
1/2 TBSP dried thyme (or fresh if you have it)
1.5kg organic, free-range chicken

1. Preheat oven to 150C/300F. Take butter out of the fridge and let it soften in a warm spot. Take the chicken out of the fridge and allow to start coming to room temperature.

2. Boil water, put the cranberries in a bowl and when the water has boiled, pour over the dried cranberries so that they are covered. Let it stand for 10 minutes.

3. Drain the water, put the berries on a chopping board and chop roughly. Mix it with the butter and thyme until the herbs and the berries are evenly mixed throughout (if the butter is too hard, I put it in the microwave for a few seconds to let it soften some more).

4. Put the chicken in a roasting tray, breast side up. Gently pull the skin away from the breast (near the neck), keep pulling very gently so that you can create a space between the skin and the breast of the chicken. Scoop some of the cranberry butter mixture into your hands and start pushing it under the skin of the chicken. (I do all of this with my hands.) I try to push it as far down as I can, so that the breast is completely covered – under the skin – with the cranberry butter, I also try to get it under the skin covering the thigh and leg.

5. When you’re finished, rub any extra butter over the whole bird or melt a bit more butter to pour over and coat it. Crack salt and pepper over the whole chicken, and put in the oven covered with aluminum foil.

6. Roast for 1.5 hours, but I do take it out around the half-way mark to turn the roasting tray around. After 1.5 hours, take the foil off and roast for anther 30 minutes. Mine was done after 2 hours (check by piercing the joint between the thigh and the leg and see if the juices run clear or use a meat thermometer). Let the chicken rest for 15 minutes before carving. We scraped the juices out of the pan to use as a delicious gravy.

 

What are you eating for Sunday dinner? What are your favourite family recipes? 

This post is day 4 of of Living Church: A 31-Days JourneyClick here to read all posts and head over to Write 31 Days for more great topics in October.